Winter Park Projects

Of course, the park is featured in the spring and summer months, but the township and volunteers are busy in the “off season” with new projects. Among those is a remulching of some lengths of the trails. Much work has been done near the waterfall, where the fence has been extended farther down the trail, and a new drainage system should eliminate the frequent water pooling there. The mulching and fence extension were completed by siblings Liz and Nick Hornicak. These projects, along with years of dedication to the Girl Scouts and Boys Scouts, helped to earn them the highest rank in each of those organizations. Congratulations, Liz and Nick, on your Gold Award and Eagle Rank! Read more about their success here.

A bench was constructed near the same area in memory of retired Norwin teacher, nature enthusiast, frequent park-goer, and wildflower tour guide, Warren Gardner. Warren is responsible for much of the park’s success. A dedication ceremony will be scheduled for early this coming spring before our tours begin. 

Our plants won’t be in their dormant stage for much longer! Please visit the “Wildflower Walks” section in the Menu for 2017 walk dates. We hope to see you on the trails soon!

Mid April Update 2015

April 18, 2015

April showers have brought many flowers to Braddock’s Trail. We spotted a few “newcomers” blooming throughout the area with several species of wildflowers still blooming even weeks later.

Ground Ivy. Photo by Chris Federinko.

You might find Ground Ivy (above) in your own back yard. Most homeowners may cringe at the mention of this “invasive” plant. It spreads rapidly and grows in many areas across the country. If you’re a horse owner, be sure to avoid this flower, as it can be toxic to them.

Photo Apr 20, 6 19 41 PM
Hepatica (left) and Wild Ginger (right). Photos by Dr. Jack Boylan.

The rare but beautiful Hepatica (above) has now finished flowering. You’ll have to visit next year to see this one in person, but check out the Wildflower Gallery to see the park’s blueish and white varieties. You may also find it in shades of pink. You can find the three-lobed leaves around the newly built footbridge.

Pictured next to the Hepatica is another rare plant in the park, and you’ll have to ask one of our wildflower guides for its “secret” locations. Wild Ginger will soon form a reddish brown flower, which is not the most spectacular blossom at Braddock’s Trail, but the plant does attract butterflies, and the stock can be used as a substitute for ginger when cooked with sugar.

Photo Apr 20, 6 22 32 PM
Squirrel Corn (top) and Blue-Eyed Mary (bottom). Photos by Dr. Jack Boylan.

Two wildflowers that are becoming increasingly visible during this time of year are pictured above. The first, Squirrel Corn, may look much like Dutchman’s Breeches. The fern-like leaves of both plants make it difficult to tell them apart when not blooming. The flowers, though both have the same off-white coloring, show some differences. Dutchman’s Breeches blooms with a yellow band around the bottom and may look tooth-like. Squirrel Corn, as you can see from the photo, has a heart-shaped appearance.

Soon the park will be covered with Blue-Eyed Mary, which come in many different shades of blue and pink. The one pictured above is one of the first of the season, and these wildflowers will blossom well into May. If you visit the park at the right time, you’ll view a sea of blue and white created by Blue-Eyed Mary. Variations of this flower were documented by Lewis and Clark on their journey west to the Pacific.

Photo Apr 18, 10 27 17 AM
Red Trillium or “Wake-robin”. Photo by Dr. Jack Boylan.

The largest and most visible flowers at the park are Trillium, and Braddock’s Trail has two color varieties: white and red. You’ll find these blooming throughout the park starting in mid April, specifically in the valley near the waterfall. Naming the plant “Trillium” should come as no surprise to you. The prefix “tri” means “three”. Trillium grows with three distinct leaves and three petals on the flower. Ohio named Trillium their official state flower in 1986.

Our next wildflower walk is this Saturday, April 25, at 10:00A.M. See you there!

Early April Update 2015

Even this early in the season, there are many things to see at Braddock’s Trail Park. You may notice plants and animals coming to life in your own neighborhoods, and that’s certainly the case along the trails here.

Visitors to the park have reported sightings of Coltsfoot in bloom, which may look much like a “typical dandelion” to most people. Some main differences between the two flowers include leaf patterns and stem length. Coltsfoot is pictured below. You’ll find this flower near the main parking lot near the entrance to the park.

Coltsfoot - Flowers and Roots
Photo courtesy of Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences

Some blooming Hepatica were also spotted near the newly constructed bridge near the old water fountain. Click here to visit the USDA Forest Service website and learn more about this plant. Braddock’s Trail features white and blueish varieties of the flower, pictured below.

Hepatica. Photo by Chris Federinko.
Hepatica. Photo by Chris Federinko.

You’ll find Spring Beauty and Harbinger of Spring blooming throughout the park as well. Narrow-Leaf Spring Beauty is pictured below, and is one of the park’s earliest bloomers.

Narrow-leaf Spring Beauty. Photo by Chris Federinko.
Narrow-leaf Spring Beauty. Photo by Chris Federinko.

The next wildflower walk is scheduled for Saturday, April 11 at 10:00A.M. Please call the North Huntingdon Township Parks and Recreation office at 724-863-3806. We hope to see you at the park!