Late Spring 2017

Blog posts have been sparse this year – I apologize for that – but activity at Braddock’s Trail Park has not! Dozens of nature enthusiasts gathered for Dr. Jack Boylan’s talks on Saturday mornings again this spring, and they were not disappointed. We hope you made it to at least one Wildflower Walk this season. If not, there are plenty of late spring flowers left and some summer bloomers beginning to show. Please take some time to look for those on your own, and be sure to mark your calendars to sign up for a walk in April 2018.

Already done flowering for the season are Garlic Mustard, Common Winter Cress (Wild Mustard), Waterleaf, Dame’s Rocket, Phlox, May Apple, Virginia Blue Bells, Red and White Trillium, Great Solomon’s Seal, False Solomon’s Seal, Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Wild Ginger, and others. You’ll still find Dandelion, Purple Deadnettle, Ground Ivy, and several more. Please find photos of these flowers in the gallery or view previous posts.

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Dame’s Rocket.
It’s hard to believe that Dame’s Rocket (above) has been labeled as Public Enemy No. 2 by Michigan’s botanical experts. Braddock’s Trail has a few dazzling varieties of this wildflower: deep pinks to white, and some cross-pollinated mixes.

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Dame’s Rocket.
Pennsylvania Bittercress (below) is edible and often used in salads, like many plants in the mustard family. There are over 3,700 species in this plant family (Brassicaceae), including Braddock’s Trail’s Dame’s Rocket and Common Winter Cress. Broccoli, bok choy, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, and radish are also in this group. The long pods you’ll see as Bittercress bears fruit are called “silique”.

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Pennsylvania Bittercress.
Waterleaf (below) is on its way out, but it’s certainly a sight around the park in late spring, especially along the main roadway before Stinging Nettle and Jewelweed take over that area.

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Waterleaf.
Stinging Nettle can be a monster for those who encounter it, as the tiny hairs can cause severe skin irritation. Question Mark butterflies, named for the pattern on the underside of their wings, find this plant rather useful, as adults lay eggs on nettles, and caterpillars use them as food. Humans also have uses for Stinging Nettle, many of them medicinal. Treating painful muscles and joints, eczema, arthritis, gout, and anemia are among those uses.

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Stinging Nettle and Question Mark butterfly.
If you see a White Violet like the one below, but with a spread of purple on the underside of the flower, that is a Canadian White Violet. Braddock’s Trail seems to have both varieties. This white flower represents the willingness to take chances with happiness, and the park also has yellow and purple. These flowers like shade, so you’ll find them through the trails and out of open spaces.

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White violet.
Please visit the pet-friendly park over the next few months to view the summer wildflowers. A picnic area is available near the parking lot with scenic lookouts at the top of the hill on the left side of the main road. Don’t forget to explore the waterfall and all of the trails.

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