Mid-April 2016

April 16, 2016

A common interjection used on our walk today was “wow.” That’s hardly the word to describe the experience of our largest group of participants in the last several years, but it did the trick. Let’s start with the most obvious “wow” of the day. An April snow shower last week didn’t keep one of the state’s largest populations of Blue-eyed Mary from spreading like…a snow shower?

You can’t miss these! Blue-eyed Mary takes over the park in April.

Due to some genetic mutations or cross-pollination, you’ll spot some not-so-blue-eyed flowers from this species.

Blue-eyed Mary variations.

Shades of pink and purple are featured alongside the common blue, and even an almost bleached-white cluster was spotted (above).

Heading down to the footbridge built by Eagle Scout Brock Shaffer, you’ll find that Hepatica is almost done flowering, save one. Near that bridge, you probably won’t see any fish, but Trout Lilly (below) has been busy putting out large, drooping yellow flowers. The leaf patterns resemble the appearance of a Pennsylvania Brook Trout, hence the name.

Trout Lilly. Only about 1% of adult plants bloom.

We have an exciting development on the identification of a plant we thought was Self-Heal (Heal-All, Cure-All). Thanks to some more information and an expert eye from our senior biologist, Dianne Walters, we can now identify this early bloomer as Purple Deadnettle (below). Please accept this new identification and apply it to earlier posts about Self-Heal.


Purple Deadnettle was featured as Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s “Weed of the Month” last spring. It is a member of the mint family, but its uses in cuisine are limited. Young leaves can be used in a simple salad. Other “nettles” tend to have a sting, or cause irritation, but this plant’s sting is “dead.”

 

Dandelion (left) and Coltsfoot (right).

According to BBC’s Nature and Wildlife experts, dandelions weren’t always a target for lawn care enthusiasts. In fact, dandelions were “cultivated with care and eaten by the wealthy in sandwiches and salads” in Victorian times. Coltsfoot has a similar look, but has a much taller, drooping stem, while dandelions keep close to the ground. You’ll see both of these near the parking lot.

Purple, Yellow, and Canadian White Violet.

The park’s three varieties of violet can be seen scattered throughout the trails. Keep an eye out for only very few Canadian White Violets, which separate themselves from the common White Violet with their purple underside. Take a look for that hint of purple in the photo above.

Cutleaf Toothwort (top) and Narrow-leaved Spring Beauty (bottom).

The two flowers pictured above are familiar faces all over the park, and can be found blooming throughout April. Not only do they make themselves at home in Braddock’s Trail, they are native to much of the United States and Canada. Cutleaf Toothwort, identifiable by its jagged leaves, claims the East Coast all the way to the Midwest, while Spring Beauty, with its radiant pink “veins” shows up in all states save Nevada, Florida, and Louisiana.

We’ll leave you with some shots of Virginia Bluebell (above), which you’ll find only on the narrow footpath past the old stone water fountain. Not pictured in this post, but seen on the walk were Persian Speedwell, Kidney-leaf Buttercup, White and Red Trillium, and Pennsylvania Bittercress.

Please join us for a walk this Saturday, April 23, 2016 at 10:30. You’ll see most of the wildflowers featured here and even more. Thanks to everyone for your time, attention, and company on our last walk!

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Early May 2015

May 2, 2015

Today’s walk brought a large crowd to Braddock’s Trail Park. I’m sure the sunlight and warmth had something to do with it as well. Though we’ll have to wait until next spring to see many of the wildflowers, participants in this walk were able to view the last of the bloomers.

The first of note you’ll find near the parking lot and along the main road through the park. Its greenish white flowers are unimpressive and inconspicuous, but the irritation this plant can cause is anything but subtle.

Stinging Nettle. Photo by Chris Federinko.

Stinging Nettle, pictured above, uses long hairs to distribute a “sting” to anyone brave enough to touch them. The University of California’s pest management website has more information on identification and other interesting facts about this plant.

Blue-eyed Mary. Photos by Chris Federinko.

One of the most impressive sights at Braddock’s Trail during the spring season carpets the ground around the trails. Blue-eyed Mary, which was featured in last week’s post, is flowering all over. Catch them before the leaves on the trees block the sunlight from reaching the forest floor.

May Apple. Photo by Chris Federinko.

Those umbrella shaped canopies that have developed in colonies around the park are called May Apple. These produce a small, green apple which can be toxic to humans. May Apple will produce a somewhat large white flower on the adult plants, which can be identified by their “double umbrella” appearance. Young, non-flowering plants have only one stem.

Kidney-leaf Buttercup. Photo by Chris Federinko.

Our wildflower crew was able to identify the tiny, yellow, star-shaped flowers in various areas of the park as Kidney-leaf Buttercup. Further research on this plant revealed that there are somewhere around 275 species of buttercup, which typically have the small, yellow flowers pictured above, but in different shapes and sizes. You’ll find more about this plant, including some interesting legends and stories, at the Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden website. Apparently, it’s the oldest public wildflower garden in the U.S.

Jack-in-the-Pulpit. Photo by Chris Federinko.

If you’re not looking for it, you’ll miss Jack-in-the-Pulpit. We found it loitering in a few random places, specifically along the fence near the waterfall, with one sighting near the top of the Eagle #1 Trail. This plant has an interesting hood-like formation to cover a central flower. It will grow red berries in the summer, and the roots can be dried or cooked and eaten.

Our last Wildflower Walk of the season is this Saturday, May 9, at 10:00A.M. We’re looking forward to seeing you there!

Late April Update 2015

April 25, 2015

With our largest turnout of the season, we braved this chilly Saturday morning, and our effort paid off!

Jack and Sandy Boylan leading the crew across the footbridge.

Yellow, Purple, and White Violets. Photos by Chris Federinko.
The park features three varieties of Violet, pictured above, and we were able to see all three this morning. Purple and yellow can be seen scattered through the park, but the only sighting of the white species was near the waterfall. Dr. Boylan pointed out that the underside of this White Violet is a purple color, and is actually a Canadian Violet. This type of Violet is not only rare in Braddock’s Trail, but it has also found its way into a few state-specific endangered species lists.

Bedstraw. Photo by Chris Federinko.
Bedstraw (above), also known as Goosegrass, Cleavers, or Stickywilly, has historical significance like many other plants in the park. Lacking modern mattresses and pillows, early pioneers used Bedstraw to stuff their bedding. It could be gathered easily because of its “sticky” properties. Notice the Velcro-like hairs on the leaves and stem. These latch together and allowed settlers to collect large quantities and transport them back to the homestead. Varieties of the Bedstraw sport tiny white flowers.

Trout Lily. Photos by Chris Federinko.
Trout Lily gets its name from the pattern on its leaves, which apparently mimic the design on our state fish, the Pennsylvania Brook Trout. Some also refer to it as a Dogtooth Violet, though it is not related to the violet family. A large, yellow flower hangs from a long stem. Only a small percentage of these plants actually bloom. Like May Apple, which we’ll feature next month, Trout Lily splits to two leaves in the adult plant. The younger, underdeveloped, single-leaf plants do not flower, and many can be found near marker #3.

Wild Ginger. Photos by Chris Federinko.
We got a better look at the Wild Ginger this week, which has an odd flower that hides close to the ground. It’s pictured above. Thanks for the hand modeling help, Gina! Join us next week and Sandy will show you where to find this plant.

Virginia Bluebells. Photos by Chris Federinko.
Taking the narrow path to the left of the footbridge will lead you toward the Virginia Bluebells. The small, pinkish flowers will eventually open and turn blue. You can see that change in the photo above. They prefer a wet but well-drained soil, which is probably why you can find them at the bend of the stream. If you’re a country fan, Miranda Lambert has a song named after this wildflower.

Blue-Eyed Mary. Photos by Chris Federinko.
The most visible wildflower in the park at the end of April through the first two weeks of May is the Blue-Eyed Mary. You’ll find these little guys everywhere, and if viewed from far away, they may take on the appearance of a blanket of snow. Most are blue, with some blooming in a pink or purple. A study produced several years ago claimed that Braddock’s Trail Park contains the second largest population of Blue-Eyed Mary in Western Pennsylvania. More to come on that interesting research.

Squirrel Corn, Red and White Trillium, Self-Heal, Ground Ivy, and others are also flowering at this time. We’ll feature Trillium next week along with Phlox and Solomon’s Seal.

Join us in the parking lot on Saturday, May 2, at 10:00A.M. for our next Wildflower Walk.

Mid April Update 2015

April 18, 2015

April showers have brought many flowers to Braddock’s Trail. We spotted a few “newcomers” blooming throughout the area with several species of wildflowers still blooming even weeks later.

Ground Ivy. Photo by Chris Federinko.

You might find Ground Ivy (above) in your own back yard. Most homeowners may cringe at the mention of this “invasive” plant. It spreads rapidly and grows in many areas across the country. If you’re a horse owner, be sure to avoid this flower, as it can be toxic to them.

Photo Apr 20, 6 19 41 PM
Hepatica (left) and Wild Ginger (right). Photos by Dr. Jack Boylan.

The rare but beautiful Hepatica (above) has now finished flowering. You’ll have to visit next year to see this one in person, but check out the Wildflower Gallery to see the park’s blueish and white varieties. You may also find it in shades of pink. You can find the three-lobed leaves around the newly built footbridge.

Pictured next to the Hepatica is another rare plant in the park, and you’ll have to ask one of our wildflower guides for its “secret” locations. Wild Ginger will soon form a reddish brown flower, which is not the most spectacular blossom at Braddock’s Trail, but the plant does attract butterflies, and the stock can be used as a substitute for ginger when cooked with sugar.

Photo Apr 20, 6 22 32 PM
Squirrel Corn (top) and Blue-Eyed Mary (bottom). Photos by Dr. Jack Boylan.

Two wildflowers that are becoming increasingly visible during this time of year are pictured above. The first, Squirrel Corn, may look much like Dutchman’s Breeches. The fern-like leaves of both plants make it difficult to tell them apart when not blooming. The flowers, though both have the same off-white coloring, show some differences. Dutchman’s Breeches blooms with a yellow band around the bottom and may look tooth-like. Squirrel Corn, as you can see from the photo, has a heart-shaped appearance.

Soon the park will be covered with Blue-Eyed Mary, which come in many different shades of blue and pink. The one pictured above is one of the first of the season, and these wildflowers will blossom well into May. If you visit the park at the right time, you’ll view a sea of blue and white created by Blue-Eyed Mary. Variations of this flower were documented by Lewis and Clark on their journey west to the Pacific.

Photo Apr 18, 10 27 17 AM
Red Trillium or “Wake-robin”. Photo by Dr. Jack Boylan.

The largest and most visible flowers at the park are Trillium, and Braddock’s Trail has two color varieties: white and red. You’ll find these blooming throughout the park starting in mid April, specifically in the valley near the waterfall. Naming the plant “Trillium” should come as no surprise to you. The prefix “tri” means “three”. Trillium grows with three distinct leaves and three petals on the flower. Ohio named Trillium their official state flower in 1986.

Our next wildflower walk is this Saturday, April 25, at 10:00A.M. See you there!