Early April Update (Part 2) 2015

April 11, 2015 

Our walk this Saturday uncovered an astounding number of blooming flowers. Participants were able to enjoy several wildflower sightings on this cool, sunny morning. Learn from some photos and descriptions of those plants, and feel free to click any links you see to access other informative websites.

Coltsfoot, Self-heal (Heal-all), Ground ivy, Persian Speedwell, and Pennsylvania Bittercress were spotted near the parking lot, particularly next to the large rocks.

Self-heal (top left), Persian Speedwell (bottom left), and Pennsylvania Bittercress (right). Photos by Chris Federinko.

Heal-all, also called “Self-heal” or “Cure-all,” is part of the mint family. A very common wildflower, it can often be found in your own backyard. This herb was widely used as a remedy for various illnesses, hence its nicknames. Brian Johnston created a website that gets up close and personal with this wildflower. Click here to view it.

If you don’t look closely, you’ll miss the tiny flowers of Persian Speedwell, which is also a common wildflower in our country. It’s non-native, however, and was brought from Asia some time ago. Since then it has spread throughout North America.

There was some debate among our wildflower enthusiasts about those tiny, white flowers pictured above. Eventually, we settled on Pennsylvania Bittercress, which has been spotted in every state but Arizona. Maybe it should be called “Everywhere But Arizona Bittercress”.

Cutleaf Toothwort (top) and Harbinger of Spring (bottom). Photos by Chris Federinko.

On the trails to the left of the main road, you’ll find Harbinger of Spring (above). This flower is one of the area’s earliest bloomers, and there were just a few left. The term “harbinger” refers to something that foreshadows or tells of an upcoming event. In this case, that event is the season of spring. If you happen upon one of these, you’ll know that spring is right around the corner.

Cutleaf Toothwart (above) was spotted throughout the park. Look closely for it’s rough-edged leaves. Its name comes from the “tooth-like projections” on its underground stems.

Bloodroot (left) and Dutchman's Breeches (right). Photos by Chris Federinko.
Bloodroot (left) and Dutchman’s Breeches (right). Photos by Chris Federinko.

Two “fan favorites” of the park are pictured above. Each has very noticeable, unique characteristics. The leaves of Bloodroot, for example, collapse around the stem to form what could be a protective and supportive structure. The large, white flower opens in sunlight and closes at night. Come out to the park and we’ll show you this one in bloom! Naming this wildflower comes easy, as the roots and stem produce a reddish juice, which Native Americans used as a dye for clothing and paints.

Dutchman’s Breeches provide an unusually shaped flower. After examining the photo above, you’ll notice that the flower takes the form of a pair of upside down “breeches,” or pants, with a yellow “belt”. My fiance claims that they should be called “Dutchman’s Molars” due to their tooth-like appearance. I prefer either of its nicknames to the scientific name of Dicentra cucullaria. Whew!

Join us this coming Saturday, April 18, at 10:00A.M. for another look at the wildflowers of Braddock’s Trail. Bring a friend!

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